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Plutarch's Lives
by Plutarch
Binding: Audio Cassette, cassette edition
Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks
Weight: 1.65 pound
Dimension: H: 0.75 x L: 9.5 x W: 0.52 inches
ISBN 10: 0786110961
ISBN 13: 9780786110964
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Book Description:
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: COMPARISON OF ALCIBIADES WITH CORIOLAMS. Having described all their actions that seem to deserve commemoration, their military ones, we may say, incline the balance very decidedly upon neither side. They both, in pretty equal measure, displayed on numerous occasions the daring and courage of the soldier, and the skill and foresight of the general; unless, indeed, the fact that Alcibiadea was victorious and successful in many contests both by sea and land, ought to gain him the title of a more complete commander. That so long as they remained and held command in their respective countries, they eminently sustained, and when they were driven into exile, yet more eminently damaged the fortunes of those countries, is common to both. All the sober citizens felt disgust at the petulance, the low flattery, and base seductions which Alcibiades, in his public life, allowed himself to employ with the view of winning the people's favor; and the ungraciousness, pride, and oligarchical haughtiness which Marcius, on the other hand, displayed in his, were the abhorrence of the Roman populace. Neither of these courses can be called commendable; but a man who ingratiates himself by indulgence and flattery, is hardly so censurable as one who, to avoid the appearance of flattering, insults. To seek power by servility to the people (101) is a disgrace, but to maintain it by terror, violence, and oppression, is not a disgrace only, but an injustice. Marcius, according to our common conceptions of his character, was undoubtedly simple and straightforward ; Alcibiades, unscrupulous as a public man, and false. He is more especially blamed for the dishonorable and treacherous way in which, as Thucydides relates, he imposed upon the Lacedaemonian ambassadors, and disturbed the continuance of th...


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