Don't forget to bookmark this web site !!
Used & Out of Print Books | Contact us | Home

Browse and Compare Price at 40+ Sites and 20,000+ Stores!!

|  FAQ/About us |  Recommend us |  Browse |  Memo |  Book Reviews |  Random Quotes |  Help |

 

Find more info., search and price compare for
Three More John Silence Stories
by Algernon Blackwood
Binding: Paperback, 128 pages
Publisher: IndyPublish.com
Weight: 0.44 pound
Dimension: H: 0.75 x L: 9 x W: 0.5 inches
ISBN 10: 1428004858
ISBN 13: 9781428004856
Click here to search for this book and compare price at 40+ bookstores with AddALL.com!

If you cannot find this book in our new and in print search, be sure to try our used and out of print search too!

 

Book Description:
Contents: Case I: Secret Worship
Case II: The Camp of the Dog
Case III: A Victim of Higher Space
A SELECTION FROM CASE I: SECRET WORSHIP
Harris, the silk merchant, was in South Germany on his way home from a business trip when the idea came to him suddenly that he would take the mountain railway from Strassbourg and run down to revisit his old school after an interval of something more than thirty years. And it was to this chance impulse of the junior partner in Harris Brothers of St. Paul's Churchyard that John Silence owed one of the most curious cases of his whole experience, for at that very moment he happened to be tramping these same mountains with a holiday knapsack, and from different points of the compass the two men were actually converging towards the same inn.

Now, deep down in the heart that for thirty years had been concerned chiefly with the profitable buying and selling of silk, this school had left the imprint of its peculiar influence, and, though perhaps unknown to Harris, had strongly coloured the whole of his subsequent existence. It belonged to the deeply religious life of a small Protestant community (which it is unnecessary to specify), and his father had sent him there at the age of fifteen, partly because he would learn the German requisite for the conduct of the silk business, and partly because the discipline was strict, and discipline was what his soul and body needed just then more than anything else.

The life, indeed, had proved exceedingly severe, and young Harris benefited accordingly; for though corporal punishment was unknown, there was a system of mental and spiritual correction which somehow made the soul stand proudly erect to receive it, while it struck at the very root of the fault and taught the boy that his character was being cleaned and strengthened, and that he was not merely being tortured in a kind of personal revenge.

That was over thirty years ago, when he was a dreamy and impressionable youth of fifteen; and now, as the train climbed slowly up the winding mountain gorges, his mind travelled back somewhat lovingly over the intervening period, and forgotten details rose vividly again before him out of the shadows. The life there had been very wonderful, it seemed to him, in that remote mountain village, protected from the tumults of the world by the love and worship of the devout Brotherhood that ministered to the needs of some hundred boys from every country in Europe. Sharply the scenes came back to him. He smelt again the long stone corridors, the hot pinewood rooms, where the sultry hours of summer study were passed with bees droning through open windows in the sunshine, and German characters struggling in the mind with dreams of English lawns and then the sudden awful cry of the master in German

'Harris, stand up! You sleep!'

And he recalled the dreadful standing motionless for an hour, book in hand, while the knees felt like wax and the head grew heavier than a cannon ball.

The very smell of the cooking came back to him the daily Sauerkraut, the watery chocolate on Sundays, the flavour of the stringy meat served twice a week at Mittagessen; and he smiled to think again of the half rations that was the punishment for speaking English. The very odour of the milk bowls, the hot sweet aroma that rose from the soaking peasant bread at the six o'clock breakfast, came back to him pungently, and he saw the huge Speisesaal with the hundred boys in their school uniform, all eating sleepily in silence, gulping down the coarse bread and scalding milk in terror of the bell that would presently cut them short and, at the far end where the masters sat, he saw the narrow slit windows with the vistas of enticing field and forest beyond.


|  Home |  FAQ/About us |  Link to us |  Recommend us |  Contact us |  Bookstores |  Memo |

Shipping Destination:
State:
(US only)
Display in:
Search by:

Searching for Out of Print Books? [Click Here]

[ For web hosting, AddALL recommend Liquidweb]